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Patient Care

Minimally Invasive Surgery


 

The impetus of moving from open surgeries to minimally invasive surgery has allowed for decreased blood loss, lower morbidity, shorter hospitalization, faster recovery and cost savings for many patients with urologic disease. Laparoscopy can be used for treatment of cancer of the kidney, prostate, adrenal and bladder. Treatment of stone disease has been improved with minimal invasive surgery as well.

 

Geoffrey N. Box, MD is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Urology and the Director of Laparoscopic Urologic Surgery. He completed his urology residency at The Ohio State University, Department of Urology in 2006. He then went to the University of California, Irvine, where he completed a two-year fellowship in Laparoscopy, Endourology, Image-Guided Therapy and Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopy.

   

Bodo E. Knudsen, MD is the Director of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Kidney Stone Program. He received his urologic training at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. He completed a fellowship in Endourology and Laparoscopy in 2004 at the University of Western Ontario, St. Joseph's Health Care, in London, Ontario, Canada.

   

Ahmad Shabsigh, MD is an Assistant Professor at the Ohio State University, Department of Urology. After completing his urology training in the Department of Urology at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York, he joined the fellowship program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

   

David S. Sharp, MD is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Urology at the Ohio State University, Department of Urology. He completed his residency training at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Glickman Urological Institute in Cleveland. He completed fellowship training in urologic oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York where he gained expertise in open, laparoscopic and robotic surgery.