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Patient Care

Varicocelectomy


Recovery Guidelines after Varicocelectomy

Most patients recover fairly quickly after the procedure but the swelling from the surgery may take weeks to get better.  In general it is recommended to limit activity for the first 5 days.  Pain should improve in the first week after surgery.

We recommend the following guidelines to shorten recovery time:

Ice
Ice packs may be used to stop scrotal and incision swelling after surgery especially in the first 48 hours.  Be sure not to leave the ice in direct contact with the skin as this risks scrotal frost-bite.

Swelling
It is normal to have scrotal swelling after surgery. Contact your surgeon if the swelling is severe, painful or if you are draining fluid from the incision.  Scrotal support by using a jock strap or tight underwear will help prevent and limit swelling.

Incision
A small amount of blood may stain the dressings for 48-72 hours after surgery. This will resolve on its own. For the first few days adding two or three gauze pads to the surgical site will help keep your clothes clean.

Bathing
You may begin to shower 48 hours after surgery.  Do not scrub the incision but allow the water to wash over it.  Tub baths or swimming are not recommended in the first 14 days after surgery.

Stitches
Stitches will dissolve on their own and do not need removal.

Pain
You will be sent home with a few days of pain medication to use only as needed.  After 2 days most patients can take ibuprofen for pain.

Activity
Patients should limit moderate or strenuous activity for 1 week minimum after surgery and are advised to wear scrotal support when restarting these activities. You may return to work when off pain medication and comfortable.  You should limit heavy lifting (greater than 10 pounds) for one week.

Sex
You may resume sexual activity once you are comfortable and this usually occurs after most swelling has gone down.

Please notify the physician if:
• The swelling is severe or not improving
• You drainage is a large amount of fluid each day
• Worsening pain after 2-3 days
• Increased redness or tenderness around the incision site
• Fever of greater than 101 degrees F.